Netflix is rolling out in Scandinavia this week, which means that it’s no longer as necessary (but still beneficial) to use services like UnoDNS. Like so many US companies though, Netflix has rolled out its service with a user agreement based on US laws, ignoring the local laws it has to abide by when operating in the new countries. 

The user agreement contains points such as the user giving up the right to sue, and that any conflicts have to be handled outside of court. You also give Netflix the right to change the user agreement at any time, and by using the service you agree to these points.

The only problem – for Netflix – is that Scandinavia isn’t the US. We don’t run around suing everything that moves over here, and the law is also much more in favor of the consumer. Here in Norway, it doesn’t matter what Netflix puts in its user agreement, or that people agree to it, because it’s automatically void if it breaks Norwegian law. If Netflix ever does anything to get themselves in a court room, which isn’t very likely I might add, that user agreement isn’t going to help them.

I have to say I find it amusing how a lot of US-based companies think they can do whatever they want in the rest of the world. European consumer authorities are infamous for pissing off everyone from Apple to Microsoft (arguable not the biggest leap ever, but you get my point) by slapping them in the face with a printed copy of reality, and I think these companies need a bit of cold water in the face every now and then.

[Aftenposten]