While the LG Nexus 4 and Samsung Nexus 10 are officially for sale in the Google Play Store, the latest version of Jelly Bean – Android 4.2 – is also available for owners of other Nexus devices to download and install, as well. Of course, the easiest way to upgrade your Nexus device is to navigate to SettingsAbout phone or About tabletSystem updates.

Luckily, since most people are not yet able to upgrade this way quite yet, Google has posted public download links, which you can subsequently flash through ADB or in your custom recovery. These steps require a working knowledge of how to do these things, so if you aren’t very comfortable with this, just wait for it to show up automatically on your device.

Otherwise, proceed.

  1. Download the update for the Samsung Galaxy Nexus (GSM, build JZO54K only) or the ASUS Nexus 7 (WiFi, build JZO54K only). If you have a different version or build of the Galaxy Nexus or Nexus 7, you’ll have to wait a bit longer.
  2. If you have a custom recovery, just flash this as you would any other .zip. That’s it!
  3. If you have a stock recovery, boot into the bootload by turning off your device, and then holding the volume down + power button at the same time.
  4. Press volume up until you see the option to go to the recovery.
  5. Once you see the Android with a red exclamation point, press volume up + power at the same time. (You may have to do this several times until you see a new menu.)
  6. Select the option to “apply update from adb.”
  7. Place the update .zip in your ADB directory, and then connect your device to your computer with a USB cable.
  8. Open a command prompt on your computer.
  9. For the Galaxy Nexus, type:
    adb sideload e587de13bf8a.signed-takju-JOP40C-from-JZO54K.e587de13.zip
    For the Nexus 7, type:
    adb sideload 094f6629314a.signed-nakasi-JOP40C-from-JZO54K.094f6629.zip
  10. You’ll see a progress bar go all the way up to 100%. When this is done, reboot your device and enjoy the latest update!

You won’t lose any settings or files updating this way, but you will lose root. However, OTA Rootkeeper is generally successful at restoring root access, as it did in my case.

Enjoy!

[Android Police: 1, 2]