After preorder problems, shipping delays, a generally botched launch, and a seemingly long wait on my part, the LG Nexus 4 finally arrived at my door. I could spend some time talking about how LG was an unexpected choice as manufacturer, the more specific features of the Nexus 4, or the Android 4.2 experience, but I’ll save that for the full review. For now, I’ll get to what many people have been waiting for (I know I have): pictures of the elusive device.

The packaging of the Nexus 4 is consistent with the rest of the Nexus line, and feels solid enough for a quality product. The colorful sleeve on the far left slides off to reveal a simple black box, the top of which pulls off to reveal the front of the device. It is a very common packaging choice, but only because it works quite well. The Nexus 4 is presented front and center, with little complexity to distract from the device.

Underneath the Nexus 4 in the box are all of the included accessories. As has become standard, there are actually very few accessories included in the box. No headphones are present, and the only addition other than the standard USB cable and AC adapter is the SIM removal tool, which i something that I’m sure I’ll lose track of. A quick start booklet was also included, but I didn’t even open it. I doubt that there are many people who do.

Here is a picture of all the packaging and its contents. As you can see, there is very little included with the Nexus 4, but in my opinion that is fine. There’s no need for clutter when everyone is interested in the device anyways, so effective packaging with just the necessary accessories is a good thing. I especially like that Google includes only one quick start book, as opposed to the six or seven that came with my last Verizon device. Some users may lament the lack of headphones, but you can’t really complain when the device costs only $299. Anyways, a much better pair of headphones than what comes with most smartphones can be purchased for less than $15.

As a final note, here’s a sort of teaser shot of the Nexus 4′s unique back. It is obviously clear that the glass is quite glossy, but the patterned sequin grid can still be seen. I mentioned when images of the Nexus 4 first leaked that I wasn’t a fan of the “bejeweled” back cover, but the effect is much more subtle in person. So far, despite my qualms about the durability of the glass, I quite like the design of the back cover.

I’ll begin covering the Nexus 4′s multitude of features in the coming weeks, but in the mean time if there’s anything you want to know about the device right away, feel free to ask a question in the comments.