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In a move aimed at bolstering its declining customer base, Sprint has set forth a $60 unlimited talk, data, and text plan for individuals for both new and existing customers starting Friday.

Sprint is also offering data-hungry family plans for $100, and pulling a T Mobile stunt and paying up to $350 to get you out of your contract with another carrier.

The details of the plan, and the plan itself, are set to be revealed on Friday.

But is Sprint for me?

Nashville SensorlyIf you’re wondering if Sprint is right for you, or if another carrier might be best, rather than coverage maps provided by the carrier or internet testimonials by people who don’t live in your region that generally end with “well I have no problem with them,” or “they’re the worst carrier ever,” head on over to Sensorly to get unbiased unpaid coverage reports from users phones in your areas of travel.

People have mentioned the Sprint commentary on Pocketables is unabashedly negative, so check your area out on Sensorly for yourself and make up your own mind.

Not only do Sensorly maps have signal strength (which you probably can get from the carrier,) they’ll tell you when you’re looking at an area with great signal but absolutely no back end internet for the tower, such as my home Sprint 4G LTE connection, which gets 1.7Mbps, or a little over half the speed of 3G, or my work internet with relatively weak LTE signal but 24Mbps downloads.

Details of the plans?

Unfortunately I don’t have access to any details, but I can bet that Sprint will be sticking to their two year contract model and maintaining or raising the early termination fees for fear of people in a non-serviced area bolting.

Or maybe the network is now strong enough that Sprint is confident its level of service can match that of other 4G LTE providers. We’ll know tomorrow.

[Wall Street Journal]