Amazon's TransparentThis Saturday, to celebrate the Golden Globe wins for the series Transparent, Amazon is streaming the series to non-Amazon-Prime members all day, as well as dropping subscription rates to Amazon Prime to $72, down from $99 yearly.

The $72 is a nod to this being the 72nd Annual Golden Globe Awards, so we should probably be thankful this isn’t the 130th Golden Globes, but curse that it’s not the second.

Amazon Prime allows you to get free two-day shipping, access to thousands of movies and TV shows for no additional cost, options to get music, movie, and possibly app credits in your account if you really didn’t need that electric pig plucker this week.

All around it’s a pretty decent deal. I worked it out that last year I purchased about $250 of things I did not need at that point just to get the free shipping (when you’ve got a baby you find you order plenty of items that just don’t add up to $35). Prime helped me out a bit with the overflowing shelves and may save me money this year from not having to come up with something that is $5.17 in order to get that free shipping.

Coming in at $6 a month on special, it’s not a bad deal, even if they do refuse to allow Chromecast support. Chromecast support denial is mostly because they don’t have the Google Play Store or associated Play Services, which Chromecast needs, and they don’t want to have to tell Kindle owners they’re out of luck while all the other Android kiddies could Chromecast Amazon with no issues.

If you haven’t heard about Transparent, well it’s pretty riveting. My wife and I got through season one in two days, and we’re not the binge-watching types.

While the Amazon originals are still pretty sparse, there are several series upcoming and what they don’t have in terms of original content is bolstered by Prime Music, two day shipping, etc.

If you’re considering joining Prime, we’re also in pilot season in which you can help choose which series to greenlight. Those that don’t get greenlit may appear elsewhere in a year or so. This is actually something that most networks will not do, holding onto the rights indefinitely with only the network heads seeing the pilot and the person behind it unable to sell it elsewhere if it doesn’t go live.

[Amazon PR]