Image WSMV broadcast, my tv, some alien language

WSMV reported last night in some of the most strained language I’ve ever seen crammed onto a TV that Google Fiber is considering throwing in the towel in Nashville after paying for access to 700+ poles and thus far Comcast and AT&T only managing to so far service ~100.

Nashville is closing in on two years of construction and has netted Google about seven customers.

At issue is in order to get Google fiber on the Nashville Electric Service poles they have to contact NES (the owners of nearly all the poles,) who then contacts Comcast and AT&T to each go out to the pole and verify that Google has the space, or make space for Google’s fiber and equipment.

Google moved into this market after having experienced the exact same thing in multiple other markets where they pushed through a “One touch Make Ready” ordinance for a modern digital economy. The Metro Nashville council has been dragging its heels in capitulating to the Goog’s demands and it seems that both they and the Music City Mayor may not understand that perhaps Comcast and AT&T might have compelling reasons to work slower than a snail running through hot tar and chunky peanut butter.

Basically what’s happened in all markets to date if I read things correctly.

Comcast & AT&T are of course opposed to OTMR claiming that their customers would be adversely impacted if Google’s pole subcontractors do what Google fiber subcontractors have been doing (make life miserable for anyone who wants water or electricity).

After a report claiming that 50+ water lines and several gas pipelines were drilled through that sort of worry is fresh in the minds of Metro Council, although OTMR would require NES approved subcontractors.

The whole issue about broadband in Nashville was caught from a very low rate stream on the Metro Nashville Network and reminded me of the 56k days of attempting video chats.

While I still firmly hold the belief that Comcast is evil and everything should be done to annoy them, Google knew this was going to be a long slow rollout and that this slow deployment was going to happen. Their threat to abandon the multimillion dollar fiber they laid if they don’t get a law passed allowing them to move other people’s equipment seems hollow and petulant.

Also I would have expected a Google Spokesperson to have a collared Google Fiber shirt for public meetings, but then again. Maybe we should expect Google to actively attempt to not conform.